Suspended door supervisor pleads guilty to working unlicensed

13 June 2019


Yesterday, 12 June, Alan Blake (35) of Cardiff pleaded guilty at Merthyr Tydfil Magistrates’ Court to working as a door supervisor despite having had his licence suspended following his conviction of criminal damage at Glamorgan Valley Magistrates’ Court on 19 April 2018.
 
Blake admitted to working illegally at Merthyr Tydfil’s Iron Dragon pub in October and November last year. The Security Industry Authority (SIA) brought the prosecution, having already suspended Alan Blake’s licence in October 2018 due to the earlier criminality.
 
South Wales Police suspected that Alan Blake was still working as a door supervisor after his licence was suspended, and they alerted the SIA.
 
The police were able to confirm to the SIA that Blake worked at the Iron Dragon on five occasions in October and November 2018. 
 
The SIA subsequently interviewed Alan Blake. He admitted to using his brother’s licence details (unbeknown) to enable him to resume his role as a door supervisor. Alan Blake worked under contract to Amber Taverns, the pub chain that manages the Iron Dragon. The SIA is continuing its investigations into Blake’s employer.
 
Mr Blake was sentenced to pay a fine of £300 and is required to pay court costs of £500 and a victim surcharge of £30.
 
Nathan Salmon, one of our Criminal Investigations Managers said, today:
“Alan Blake deliberately disregarded the licensing regime as he continued to work as an unlicensed door supervisor when his licence was suspended. The process of suspensions is necessary for the SIA to assess the suitability for someone to hold a licence and ensure public safety.  This was a course of conduct with offending on five separate occasions over a period of three weekends. He also dishonestly used his brother’s licence number to obtain employment and bypass the regulatory regime which is enshrined in law to protect the public.” 
 
Notes to Editors:
1. By law, security operatives working under contract must hold and display a valid SIA licence. Information about SIA enforcement and penalties can be found on the website.

2. The offence relating to the Private Security Act (2001) that is mentioned in the  above news release is Section 3 working without a licence.
 
3. The SIA process of suspensions and revocations is available online via: https://www.sia.homeoffice.gov.uk/Pages/enforcement-revocation.aspx
 
The Private Security Industry Act 2001 ​is available online via: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2001/12/contents ​
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