Luton security boss convicted for second time for operating illegally

20 July 2020


Repeat offender, Robert Dass, a former Luton security boss has paid a significant confiscation order after being found guilty of operating illegally for the second time.
 
On 15 July 2020 Robert Dass, was fined £1800 for two counts of contravention of the Private Security Industry Act 2001 and ordered to pay prosecution costs of £7,029.50 at Harrow Crown Court. The court also heard that Dass has already satisfied a confiscation order related to these offences totalling £8,654.70. This resulted from our pursuit of Dass’ criminal benefit for unlicensed business dealings in accordance with the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 (POCA). 
 
Wednesday’s result follows Dass’s guilty plea at Luton Crown Court in June 2019. We prosecuted him for working as a security director without a licence.
 
Dass admitted at the earlier hearing to being the director of Roberts Nationwide Support Services Ltd. His guilty plea came ahead of a scheduled trial at Luton and South Bedfordshire Magistrates’ Court.
 
Her Honour Judge Herbert said at the hearing on Wednesday:
 “You are no longer involved with this industry in any way, which I am frankly glad to hear.  
 
You don’t seem to have learned much from what happened before.This is a responsible business, it is important that the regulations are complied with. 

 
I will allow you six months to make [fine and cost] payment and 28 days’ imprisonment in default of payment. A victim surcharge will be applied in the correct amount.”  
Nathan Salmon, one of our Criminal Investigations Managers, said:
 
"To protect the vast majority of reputable businesses operating within our industry we will prosecute anyone who continues to ignore SIA laws. Using POCA powers extends our ability to punish such breaches having far reaching consequences. Regulation of the industry exists in order to protect those who use contracted security services and the general public.”

 
We originally prosecuted Robert Dass in March 2016 when he was found guilty at Luton Crown Court, along with his business Nationwide Security Management Ltd, of supplying multiple unlicensed security guards at sites across the UK. He was fined £2,000 and ordered to pay costs of £7,000. In addition, his company was found guilty on four counts. It was also fined £2,000 and ordered to pay costs of £7,000.

 
Dass’ continued offending was identified when our investigators were checking licences in London in October 2017. They identified Dass as a manager and supervisor to security staff at one venue. Further investigation revealed that he was also acting as a shadow director. The investigators spoke to the security guards he employed, who confirmed that he was acting as a director, and that they viewed him as the head of the company. Our investigators also gathered evidence from his clients, who were ready to identify Mr Dass as the controlling mind at his trial.

 
Dass declined a formal interview claiming that he was sick. However, he was unable to provide evidence of his illness to us. As a result, we prosecuted him for the second time.                         

 
Notes to Editors:
1. The Proceeds of Crime Act (POCA) sets out the legislative scheme for the recovery of criminal assets with criminal confiscation being the most commonly used power. Confiscation occurs after a conviction has taken place.
2. If a person has a POCA Order against them they have to pay it regardless if they serve a jail sentence.
3. By law, security operatives working under contract must hold and display a valid SIA licence. Information about SIA enforcement and penalties can be found on the website.
4. The offence relating to the Private Security Industry Act (2001) that is mentioned in the above news release are as follows:
Section 3 working without a licence (two counts)
The Private Security Industry Act 2001​ is available here.  

 
Further information:
  • The Security Industry Authority is the organisation responsible for regulating the private security industry in the United Kingdom, reporting to the Home Secretary under the terms of the Private Security Industry Act 2001. Our main duties are: the compulsory licensing of individuals undertaking designated activities; and managing the voluntary Approved Contractor Scheme.
  • For further information about the Security Industry Authority or to sign up for email updates visit www.sia.homeoffice.gov.uk. The SIA is also on Facebook- this link opens in a new window (Security Industry Authority) and Twitter- this link opens in a new window (SIAuk).​​​​​​​​​